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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
commodity. it could be exchanged for silk in india and the silk exchanged for swords in japan, and those swords would be sold back in england and the whole thing would start again. so the ex-peasant who is now running the show on a small plot of land handed over to him by the landlord would be an entrepreneur. effectively, he borrowed money from the landlord in order to pay for three things. rent of the land, wages in the form of corn, to the ex- peasants who are now wandering in the countryside knocking on doors because they don't have direct access to land, and some machinery, shears for clipping wool. so land, labor, and capital could be purchased in advance of production, on the basis that the entrepreneur, ex- peasant has to the landlord. -- on the basis of the debt that the entrepreneur, ex-peasant house to the landlord. so debt comes first, then comes distribution of income in the form of a labor contract. it will work for so many hours and i will give you so much corn. then comes production. it was a combination of this reversal of the order from having production followed by a d
, follow harry truman's eldest grandson to japan. >> everybody has their own view what happened and i don't want to argue survival to anyone in japan about the history. we're past that. and my whole purpose for being here is to listen to the living and to do what i can. >> sunday at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span 3. >> the supreme court will look at what was passed in 2008 by a majority of 6-3 i believe and going to say that is precedent. and indiana had a -- >> they decided on the indiana case. it was constitutional for them to establish i.d. they did not say that all of those states -- >> correct, they talked about indiana. let me finish because you misrepresented what i said. >> no, i didn't. >> the supreme court is the law of the land. >> when i hear these accusations that black people, voter i.d. laws disproportionately affect minorities -- it says to me that we have something missing in our brain. to me, white americans can get i.d.'s to vote and follow the laws, what are you telling black people, that somehow they're not good enough, they are less? and that's what bothers me about the
american history tv, follow president truman's eldest grandson as he visits japan. >> everyone has their own view as top what happened. and i don't want to argue survival or about the history. we're past that. my whole purpose for being here is to listen and do what i can to see it doesn't happen again. >> we will discuss meetings with bomb survivors and inspiration for his trip. sunday on c-span 3. >> mark zandi said returning to clinton-era tax rates would hurt the economy but is necessary to get the deficit under control. his comments came at a forum and also bush administration lawrence lindsay and clinton white house chief of staff. >> thank you so much and thank you chairman bachus for turning us and turn it over to peter cook who will moderate our tax panel on tax reform. >> i got a feeling you have to head back to the hill. we hope to come up with some answers and ideas from this panel. we have -- we'll write them down. i'll hand them to your staffer. you hear the mission. we have to come up with some ideas that can pass congress and meet with everyone's approval, so no sma
incomplete without the settlement of a war that ended with the u.s. as the dominant power. europe and japan on their backs and the u.s. dollar as the international system's reserve currency. that is vital to the system we're in. it is not just the 1930's and that new deal. the dominant parties might be called regime parties. there were able to use their political strength to implement and caring for the basic themes around which these political settlements were organized. jefferson's party put forth a teams of democracy and expansion. after are the themes of national regulation and internationalism. the u.s. has rarely had a two- party system but rather, a one and a half party system consisting of a regime party and a competitor forced to adapt its dominant position. these competitors, the whigs of the 1840's and the republicans of the post-war iraq occasionally won national elections. it is interesting to read the platforms of the democratic party in the 1840's because the assault the whigs for copying them. that was the case. the federalist party which died era,n the jefferson nian did no
the committee in the house -- in house resolution 121. it was a resolution calling upon japan to apologize during the imperial army during world war ii, women forced into sexual slavery. he achieved justice for those who suffered atrocities in the past and his leadership will be missed. i also want to thank him for his leadership on the issue of pat tillman, soldier who was -- he lost his life in a firefight when in fact he was killed through -- and i want to appreciate that. lynn woolsey came to congress with a compelling story about how with the helping hand from her government she was able to raise three children by herself and have a successful career serving the people of marina and sonoma counties. she's been a tireless voice for family-friendly policies, for protecting the coastline of northern california and for bringing our troops home and ending the misguided wars in iraq and afghanistan. lynn was a leader of the congressional progressive caucus and i call her the mom of the caucus. and her passionate voice on progressive issues, she will be missed. her leadership will be missed
on the obligation and the expenditure of u.s. and government of japan funds to support the military buildup on guam. i believe that this bill sends a strong message that the united states remains committed to providing resources to refocus on the asia pacific region. and also, i'm also pleased that the conference report includes a requirement that flags the district of columbia and the u.s. territories be displayed at u.s. military installations around the world. and i ask my colleagues to support this conference report. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. the gentleman from massachusetts is recognized. mr. frank: mr. speaker, the request of the chairman of the full committee, i would now yield to him, i believe he intends to conduct a colloquy, two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for two minutes. mr. mckeon: i thank the gentleman for yielding. mr. speaker, i yield two minutes to the gentleman from kentucky for the purpose of a colloquy. >> thank you, chairman mckeon. i certainly want to thank you and mr. smith and your staffs for your hard work
and so i -- election.'s the u.s.-japan airlines serves as a cornerstone of peace and prosperity in the asia-pacific and look forward to working closely with the new japanese prime minister, cabinet, and the people of japan for bilateral, regional, and global issues. i would also like to say the president appreciates prime minister nota's contributions to u.s.-japan relations on a number of issues and would like to thank the prime minister for his service and wish him well in his future endeavors. as you know, the new prime minister does not take office -- and i did not want to get ahead of that, before we start talking about potential meetings or policy discussions with him. >> you made the point about -- that that was not the day to talk about policy, talking about gun control. but we are looking for more specifics especially since the president said quite plainly he would use all the powers of the office to engage americans on the issue. senator lieberman suggested a national commission on violence. would the president consider setting up a presidential task force? >> what i t
in japan. the president was going to one of these economic things in philippines and india. darmin calls baker. he says, jim, the president is going to love this bill. he is gone to love it. just tell him to shut up. his friends are not gone to let this bill. there want to get to him. don't say anything until you can fully brief him. that is the way it happened, and that was the past as question of the process. >> that was the process in 1986. can that happen this day? >> it feels like a different environment. i do not know, but right now we are in the middle of a political test of wills on marginal tax rates. it is interesting we're not fighting on the underlying principle, which is that wealthy ought to pay more in order to help us close debts and deficits, get our economy back on track. right now the president thinks he won a point, was vindicated by his victory in the election, and republicans did not want to do that, but he has the hand in this struggle. restoring the clinton tax rates is something i would support. we supported them back in 1991 when bill clinton was running for pre
central bank. that's not fannie and freddie- like but still has a government backdrop. japan, australia, rbs is part of their markets. that gets you back to where the u.s. is now. you have an outstanding mortgage stock in the united states. some of this data is a little bit dated from 2012. but it gives you some snapshots about where the delinquencies are. something like a quarter have an underwater nature to the mortgage. there are still some challenges outstanding in the markets. where is the credit going to come back into the system outside of the fanny-freddie model? there are lots of calls. you hear from jeb hensarling. fannie and freddie and the fha have to be drawn back in some way. how do you do that? this provides at least some of the basic high points of where is it that the private capital is going to come from. if you have a pension fund, you put that money into the u.s. housing stock market. do you lend that to borrower? do you want to loan money to uy a house?% to by hous the government may be doing that. the private markets say they will put the money somewhere else. kind
of the first things he did after leaving office was except a speaking engagement in japan for $2 million. is that right? for some reason, that took me back. today it would just go off my back like nothing had happened. what is more natural? but at the time -- so. ♪ take all the money we need for school spend it on a weapon you can never use make the world an offer they cannot refuse open up the door and let the shark- men feed sell the ponderosa to the japanese slap leather go on, ron just about to go myself turn the world into a tv show it is the same game wherever you go one big advertisement for the status quo as if you knew how the story ends as if you are not sitting in a room alone and there was somebody real at the end of the telephone somebody real just about to dial your number ♪ get all worked up go back to war tie that yellow ribbon a side of fries big mac norman i usedn' to love a parade big mac falafel just about to go myself ♪ \[applause] "big mac falafel" in the code for the oversimplification of the arab world and the tendency of american foreign policy at the time
york's capital, albany. >> the chiefs of staff had to make the plan for the invasion of japan without considering the atomic bomb. it was estimated it would cost 700,000. >> i choose to honor both, both the sacrifice of american servicemen fighting their way to the pacific and of a little girl who died as a result of an atomic bombing. it is unimaginable but that must of been like -- what that must of been like. -- have been like. follow clifton truman daniel sunday on c-span 3. 9:00 p.m. eastern. "washington journal" continues. att: this week we're looking the united states long-term energy outlook. we will use a new report that came out this week from the u.s. energy information administration that protect u.s. energy consumption out to the year 2014. adam sieminski is the administrator of the eia. missionwhat the eia's is. guest: it is one of the 14 of the independent statistical agencies here in washington. we are responsible for energy information. we are by law -- it is supposed to be unbiased and neutral in our development of energy analysis, using the debt that we collect -- d
generation in hawaii, his father, an imgray -- imigrae from japan, at a time there was a strong and real prejudice that existed in america. a man who came of age as the second great war burst upon the scene and that very prejudice against japanese americans reached a crescendo. december 7, 1942, as majority leader's alluded to, on the way to mass, on the way to church with your grandfather, listening to the radio about the bombing that was taking place at pearl harbor, at first as danny told the story, over several times, at least i heard it, he thought it was ans oron -- orson wells thing. they looked on the horizon and could see, could see pearl harbor. the bombs bursting. he was then labeled an enemy alien. he was labeled an enemy alien, as his family was. because of his japanese ancestry . but he fought, he fought for the chance to fight for his country. he had to fight for the chance to fight for his country. not just to prove that he was a loyal american, but because, because he knew, he knew what was at stake, because it was the right thing to do. my mom, as i was telling my colle
to keep prices low, but to keep the price is lower than germany or japan, to keep the capital coming here, to keep the german and japanese finance going. i don't believe in pointing fingers at anyone. we are all part of this system that we have created over the last few decades. which met its nemesis because of its hubris. >> i would like to ask three questions. one is to summarise, briefly, what did happen in greece? why did we slide further down in the world? number two, could you please summarize an alternative approach? what could, for example, the greek prime minister have done instead of what they did it? and third, there is a hamiltonian economic system from 1789 that created a great america before america became a global power -- could that help greece? >> i will answer your questions starting at the beginning. what happened in greece? we created the eurozone. let me put it this way. in our country, because you come from greece, too, they have been monopolizing the headlines. there is something wrong with the world, if this can happen. imagine if there was a fiscal crisis in the g
] with anyone in japan about the history. i think we're past that. my purpose for being here is to listen, to honor the dead, to listen to the living. and to do what i can so to see that this doesn't happen again. >> cliffton truman daniel will join us in washington to discuss. sunday at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span 3. >> the u.s. house has completed its legislative work for the week. but the senate is in today. congressional leaders continue discussions on the fiscal cliff. we're going to hear, as a matter of fact, from senate democratic leaders. a briefing scheduled for noon eastern, about 20 minutes away. we'll take you there live when it gets under way. this morning part of our week-long and couple of weeks' long conversation on the fiscal cliff, a focus this morning on the expiring tax provisions. host: today we're looking at the issue of tax extenders or tax incentives for business and individuals. and joining us in this discussion is sam goldfarb, who is a tax writer for c.q. roll call. what are tax extenders? >> well, they're temporary tax breaks. that's basically i think the most
the japan emperor award in 2009 and was the first japanese american to achieve this accomplishment. he also has received national and colorado f-4 club awards, the colorado state university livestock leader and colorado state best teacher award. he is a true pioneer who has mitted -- committed his life work to colorado and the western united states. these stories highlight an amazing man and i am proud to honor the doctor on the house floor. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from new york rise? without objection. mr. higgins: mr. speaker, this week people met on the national defense authorization act. as we consider final agreement, i rise in support of language in the conference report which prevents the movement in retirement of c-130 aircraft. mr. speaker, western new york is home to the niagara falls air reserve station which hosts a robust fleet of c-130 aircraft. these aircraft were among the planes used to deliver supplies to regions of new york and new jersey in the aftermath of hurricane dev
but there was one in japan, a tremendous disaster that's hitting the west coast, understand the debris issue as well. i think none of us knows what's going to impact us. so really, chairman landrieu, really appreciate you working on this issue. obviously secretary done vand and administrator fugate, thank you for your words here. very impressive first panel, listening to so many senators that have just seen tremendous things happen to their citizens and we all need to stand up and help them now as well. as i said, we have to learn from this and get it right and i was listening to your response on senator on the cdbg in particular. i know we have worked to make that more flexible. i think that there's been some proposals out there about making it more flexible. but i'd like to go back and ask you, what issues have you seen in particular with cdbg that says to you this is what we need to change? >> so, a number of the things have to do with simply the fact that cdbg is envisioned as a block grant for regular sort of course of business, not only on housing but infrastructure and other community needs.
in japan, in the united states they immediately want to say, what is the president doing? what is he saying? what's the policy? what's the action? 30 years ago that would have been one of the questions, but it wouldn't be a central question. presidents have -- it's amazing what they can do. i think obama has more power than bush had, for instance. >> and yet i believe it's your view that we know less about our presidents, less about the inner workings about the white house. why is that? is that our fault? >> well, it is in part our fault. and i think the message managers in the white house get better and better and more skillful. that it's a barrier often, and you have to -- god knows how much time i spent breaking down -- breaking that logjam in the white house saying i'm doing this book. i got these stories. i got these memos. i got these notes. ok. we'll answer questions. it's not something where they're standing there on pennsylvania avenue saying to the reporters, come on, we're dying to have you hold us accountable for what we're doing. >> you do manage to break people down. what if t
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)